With 11 wickets from two matches, Gary Gilmour was the surprise package of the tournament © Getty Images
With 11 wickets from two matches, Gary Gilmour was the surprise package of the tournament © Getty Images

Imagine this: a bowler does not play the league matches; he gets picked only in the semi-final; first he registered what was then the best bowling figures in the history of One-Day Internationals (ODIs) — a spell of 12-6-14-6 — to bowl out the hosts for 93; then he walks out with his side at 39 for six, and smashes a 28-ball 28 not out (the top score of the match) to take his side to victory. Does it get any better than this?

It does. Gary Gilmour’s fairytale saga did not end with the semi-final against England at Headingley. He claimed five for 48 in the final at Lord’s, and his only failure came when he smashed an 11-ball 14 against a steep asking rate. Not only did he pick up 11 wickets at a ridiculous 5.63, but the men he dismissed were Dennis Amiss, Barry Wood, Tony Greig, Frank Hayes, Keith Fletcher, Alan Knott, Alvin Kallicharran, Clive Lloyd, Rohan Kanhai, Viv Richards, and Deryck Murray: in other words, not a single tail-ender.

In addition, he scored 42 runs, getting out once, at a strike rate of 107.6. While Gilmour’s was the most spectacular performance of the tournament, there were some other stories as well. Let us look at the records.

Batting records

Surprisingly, none of the top four run-getters (Glenn Turner, Amiss, Majid Khan, and Fletcher) came from the finalists; at fifth was Turner, who was, again, not from the champions. Kallicharran led the West Indian chart (197 runs at 49.25) with Lloyd coming second with 158 at 52.67.

Most runs

  M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Glenn Turner 4 4 2 333 486 171* 166.50 68.5 2
Dennis Amiss 4 4 243 288 137 60.75 84.4 1 1
Majid Khan 3 3 209 287 84 69.67 72.8 3
Keith Fletcher 4 3 207 299 131 69.00 69.2 1 1
Alan Turner 5 5 201 259 101 40.20 77.6 1

While Glenn Turner, with two unbeaten hundreds, easily topped the batting charts in terms of average, Gavaskar came a surprising second, mostly because of his two not outs. His strike rate, however, read an abysmal 41.2.

Highest batting averages (100 or more runs)        
  M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Glenn Turner 4 4 2 333 486 171* 166.50 68.5 2
Sunil Gavaskar 3 3 2 113 274 65* 113.00 41.2 1
Deryck Murray 5 3 2 105 136 61* 105.00 77.2
Majid Khan 3 3 209 287 84 69.67 72.8 3
Keith Fletcher 4 3 207 299 131 69.00 69.2 1 1

Lloyd’s blitzkrieg in the final puts him at the top of the strike rates (he is the only one to have scored at more than a run a ball). Amiss and Zaheer Abbas, with excellent averages and strike rates in excess of eighty, have done reasonably well.

Highest strike rates (100 or more runs)          
  M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Clive Lloyd 5 3 158 151 102 52.67 104.6 1 1
Zaheer Abbas 3 3 136 155 97 45.33 87.7 1
Dennis Amiss 4 4 243 288 137 60.75 84.4 1 1
Ross Edwards 5 4 1 166 208 80* 55.33 79.8 2
Alan Turner 5 5 201 259 101 40.20 77.6

In all, the tournament boasted of six hundreds. Glenn Turner scored two of them, Alan Turner, Amiss, and Fletcher one apiece, but the grandest of all came in the final, when Lloyd scored his 85-ball 102 that was befitting of a World Cup champion captain.

Hundreds      
  Score Against Venue
Glenn Turner 171* East Africa Edgbaston
Dennis Amiss 137 India Lord’s
Keith Fletcher 131 New Zealand Trent Bridge
Glenn Turner 114* India Old Trafford
Clive Lloyd 102 Australia Lord’s
Alan Turner 101 Sri Lanka The Oval

Bowling records

Gilmour, with his 11 wickets from two matches, astonishingly finished as the leading wicket-taker of the tournament. Bernard Julien and Keith Boyce were tied at second place with ten wickets apiece, while Richard Hadlee, Andy Roberts, and Dennis Lillee claimed eight wickets each. The fast bowlers were clearly the reason behind the success of Lloyd’s men.

Most wickets                
  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Gary Gilmour 144 62 11 6/14 5.64 13.1 2.58 2
Bernard Julien 360 177 10 4/20 17.70 36.0 2.95
Keith Boyce 312 185 10 4/50 18.50 31.2 3.56
Richard Hadlee 276 162 8 3/21 20.25 34.5 3.52
Andy Roberts 340 165 8 3/39 20.63 42.5 2.91
Dennis Lillee 318 223 8 5/34 27.88 39.8 4.21 1

Gilmour once again tops the bowling averages charts, but the Englishmen emerge as the surprise package with three names (John Snow, Chris Old, and Tony Greig) in the top five, while Imran Khan sneaks in between. The absence of the West Indians is a bit surprising.

Best averages (5 or more wickets)
  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Gary Gilmour 144 62 11 6/14 5.64 13.1 2.58 2
John Snow 216 65 6 4/11 10.83 36.0 1.81
Imran Khan 103 59 5 3/15 11.80 20.6 3.44
Chris Old 195 86 7 3/29 12.29 27.9 2.65
Tony Greig 186 89 6 4/45 14.83 31.0 2.87

Obviously, Gilmour tops the strike rates chart as well, and Imran, Old, and Greig all feature on the list. Though Sarfraz Nawaz finds an entry, the chart remains elusive to the champions.

Best strike rates (5 or more wickets)        
  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Gary Gilmour 144 62 11 6/14 5.64 13.1 2.58 2
Imran Khan 103 59 5 3/15 11.80 20.6 3.44
Chris Old 195 86 7 3/29 12.29 27.9 2.65
Sarfraz Nawaz 144 107 5 4/44 21.40 28.8 4.46
Tony Greig 186 89 6 4/45 14.83 31.0 2.87

Finally, we have a new entry at the top of the bowling charts: with a ridiculous 34 from 24 overs at 1.42, Bishan Bedi (he had a 12-8-6-1 in the process) leads the charts. The next four positions — Snow, Derek Underwood, Geoff Arnold, and Peter Lever — all belong to Englishmen, which probably show they had not done a lot of errors barring that semifinal. Oh, and the sixth name on the list? Gilmour!

Best economy rates (100 or more balls)        
  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Bishan Bedi 144 34 2 1/6 17.00 72.0 1.42
John Snow 216 65 6 4/11 10.83 36.0 1.81
Derek Underwood 132 41 2 2/30 20.50 66.0 1.86
Geoff Arnold 178 70 3 23.33 59.3 2.36
Peter Lever 216 92 5 18.40 43.2 2.56

All three five-wicket hauls in the tournament went to Australians. Lillee claimed the first one, on the first day of the tournament against Pakistan at Headingley — the ground that witnessed Gilmour’s six for 14. The only other ground to see a five-wicket haul was, of course, Lord’s — in the final.

Five-wicket hauls    
  Score Against Venue
Gary Gilmour 6/14 England Headingley
Dennis Lillee 5/34 Pakistan Headingley
Gary Gilmour 5/48 West Indies Lord’s

Fielding and wicket-keeping

With nine catches and a stumping (off Ashley Mallett), Rodney Marsh topped the list of wicketkeepers, while Deryck Murray, with just a stumping less, came second. Wasim Bari had six dismissals, while Ken Wadsworth was the only other wicketkeeper barring Marsh to effect a stumping (off Hedley Howarth).

Most dismissals as wicket-keeper
  M C S D D/M
Rodney Marsh 5 9 1 10 2.00
Deryck Murray 5 9 9 1.80
Wasim Bari 3 6 6 2.00
Ken Wadsworth 4 3 1 4 1.00

As a specialist fielder, Lloyd finished with four catches — the top of the pile — while six others had a tally of three each.

Most catches as fielder  
  M C C/M
Clive Lloyd 5 4 0.80
Tony Opatha 3 3 1.00
Zaheer Abbas 3 3 1.00
Brian Hastings 4 3 0.75
Greg Chappell 5 3 0.60
Rohan Kanhai 5 3 0.60
Alan Turner 5 3 0.60

Record partnerships

Turner, along with Rick McCosker, added 182 for the opening stand against Sri Lanka at The Oval. It remained the highest stand of the tournament for any wicket. The fourth-wicket stand is from the final (Kanhai and Lloyd) while the seventh from the semifinal (Doug Walters and Gilmour); both turned out to be crucial.

Highest partnerships      
Wicket Runs Batsman 1 Batsman 2 Against Venue
1 182 Rick McCosker Alan Turner Sri Lanka The Oval
2 176 Dennis Amiss Keith Fletcher India Lord’s
3 149 Glenn Turner John Parker East Africa Edgbaston
4 149 Rohan Kanhai Clive Lloyd Australia Lord’s
5 89* Mike Denness Chris Old India Lord’s
6 99 Ross Edwards Rodney Marsh West Indies The Oval
7 55* Doug Walters Gary Gilmour England Headingley
8 48 Brian McKechnie Dayle Hadlee England Trent Bridge
9 60 Abid Ali Srinivas Venkataraghavan New Zealand Old Trafford
10 64* Deryck Murray Andy Roberts Pakistan Edgbaston

Team aggregates

England’s 334 for four remained the highest score of the tournament, while there were three other scores in excess of 300, all against the minnows of the era. While these were 60-over matches, given the era scores of 300 were commendable nevertheless. West Indies’ tally in the final finds a place in the top five as well.

Highest team scores    
Team Score Against Venue
England 334/4 (60) India Lord’s
Pakistan 330/6 (60) Sri Lanka Trent Bridge
Australia 328/5 (60) Sri Lanka The Oval
New Zealand 309/5 (60) East Africa Edgbaston
West Indies 291/8 (60) Australia Lord’s

Sri Lanka were bowled out for 86 by West Indies at Old Trafford; it remained the lowest score of the tournament. England’s 93 in the Headingley semifinal came next, while East Africa filled up the other three places with their three appearances.

Highest team scores
Team Score Against Venue
Sri Lanka 86 (37.2) West Indies Old Trafford
England 93 (36.2) Australia Headingley
East Africa 94 (52.3) England Edgbaston
East Africa 120 (55.3) India Headingley
East Africa 128/8 (60) New Zealand Edgbaston

Biggest margins of victory

By runs: 202

England 334/4 (60) beat India 132/3 (60)

By wickets: 10

East Africa 120 (55.3) lost to India 123/0 (29.5)

By balls to spare: 236

Sri Lanka 86 (37.2) lost to West Indies 87/1 (20.4)

Smallest margins of victory

By runs: 17

West Indies 291/8 (60) beat Australia 274 (58.4)

By wickets: 1

Pakistan 266/7 (60) lost to West Indies 267/9 (59.4)

By balls to spare: 2

Pakistan 266/7 (60) lost to West Indies 267/9 (59.4)

1975 World Cup tournament summary and more