Apart from Rilee Rossouw (above), only Nathan McCullum has golden ducks in his first two matches © AFP
Apart from Rilee Rossouw (above), only Nathan McCullum has golden ducks in his first two matches © AFP

By Abhijit Banare

Rilee Rossouw achieved a feat which he would not like to remember for long. Rossouw became the second player after New Zealand’s Nathan McCullum to achieve golden ducks in their first two matches when he was caught in the slips off Prosper Utseya’s bowling in the second One-Day International (ODI) at Harare on August 29, 2014.  There were a few players who missed achieving the feat by a narrow margin.

The dismissals:

Rossouw faced one ball before getting run-out by Malcom Waller in the third ODI of three-match series against Zimbabwe just before the start of the triangular series. With a win over Australia in the first match, South Africa chose to give rest to some of their players and brought in Rossouw. The left-hander walked in after the dismissal of Quinton de Kock. Prosper Utseya got one to spin across the left-hander and a nervous Rossouw could only edge it to the slips.

McCullum on the other hand was out in an uncomplicated fashion. He made his debut against Sri Lanka and was castled by Lasith Malinga. Wasn’t a yorker but he was bowled off a good length delivery. Two months later, Shahid Afridi trapped him leg-before for another first-ball duck. However, since then, McCullum has played 67 matches till date and he has got only one duck in his career against Sri Lanka at Hambantota at Hambantota in 2012.

Key duck highlights

  •  Harilal Shah (East Africa) had followed a golden duck with a two-ball duck

 

  • Mathew Sinclair (New Zealand) had followed a golden duck with a four-ball duck

 

  • Riaan Walters (Namibia) had followed a golden duck with a four-ball duck and never played again

 

  • Chadwick Walton (West Indies) had followed a golden duck with a two-ball duck

 

However, the most positive news for Rossouw is, Sachin Tendulkar too got ducks in his first two ODI matches. Both of them were two-ball ducks.

(Abhijit Banare is a reporter at CricketCountry. He is an avid quizzer and loves to analyse and dig out interesting facts which allows him to learn something new every day. Apart from cricket he also likes to keep a sharp eye on Indian politics, and can be followed on Twitter and blog)