Brad Haddin's counter-attacking knocks in the ongoing Ashes bore a striking resemblance to predecessor Adam Gilchrist © Getty Images
Brad Haddin’s (above) counter-attacking knocks in the ongoing Ashes bore a striking resemblance to predecessor Adam Gilchrist © Getty Images

 

Sydney: Jan 4, 2014 

 

The British media and former cricketers has reacted with a mixture of frustration and awe at veteran Australian Brad Haddin‘s remarkable ability to rescue his team, which is evident in the ongoing Ashes.

 

On the opening day of the Sydney Test, when England should have dismissed the hosts for a score of around about 200, it was once again the 36-year-old wicket-keeper who turned things around – and once again the visitors had no answers.

 

According to News.com.au, Haddin was given plenty of praise for an amazing series that has included half-centuries in the first innings of each of the five Tests, with former England captain Geoffrey Boycott mentioning in The Telegraph his disbelief of the fields set and the length bowled to Australia‘s regal counter-attacker.

 

Boycott wrote that Haddin, whom he termed as a batsman sitting on the back foot and looking for anything that is short of a length, came to the rescue again like he did all series, adding that it is puzzling that England does not seem to have worked out how and where to bowl at him.

 

The Guardian rammed home the point, saying that despite being a new year and a new city, it was the ”same old” for England as they ran up against a familiar obstacle at Australia’s mid-point, Haddin, who has been transformed into a gloriously late-blooming second coming of a cricketer.

 

Former England captain Nasser Hussain agreed on this point in the Daily Mail, and described the opening day at the SCG as ”Groundhog Day”, saying that Australia keep stumbling to 100 for five, and then they recover as Haddin is getting precisely what he wanted- deliveries that were either too full or too short.