© Wikimedia Commons and Getty Images
© Wikimedia Commons and Getty Images

Former England cricketer Fred Ridgway passed away at the age of 92. Ridgway, who was the England’s second-oldest living Test player behind Don Smith, played five Tests during the India tour of 1951-52. He also made 341 First-Class appearances for Kent, taking 1069 wickets at an average of 23.74 and an economy in a domestic career that spanned 15 years between 1946 and 1961. A major achievement during his career was collecting four wickets in as many balls against Derbyshire n 1951. He was selected for the five-Test India tour that was to be played over the winter later that year. England lost the final Test of the tour at Chennai, giving India their first-ever victory in international cricket, beating the tourists by an innings and eight wickets as the series was drawn 1-1.

Cricket has witnessed the loss of several veterans in the recent past. Harold Stapleton, Australia’s oldest living cricketer, passed away at the age of 100 on September 24. The New South Welshman played only one match for his state in 1941 before his career was cut short by the Second World War, in which he served with the Australian Army in Papua New Guinea. A punishing left-handed batsman and left-arm medium-pacer, Stapleton was labelled as the next Don Bradman. READ: Harold Stapleton passes away at the age of 100

Another veteran to breathe his last in the recent past was former Australian cricketer Arthur Morris, who passed away at the age of 93 on August 22 earlier this year. Morris was one of the two remaining members of Don Bradman’s ‘Invincibles’ of 1948, with Neil Harvey being the last remaining member of that side following his death. Morris scored 3,533 runs in 46 appearances at an average of 46.48.