The ICC concurred that international venues must be set up to their maximum possible boundary dimensions, as per the playing conditions © Getty Images (Representational Photo)
The ICC concurred that international venues must be set up to their maximum possible boundary dimensions, as per the playing conditions © Getty Images (Representational Photo)

 

Melbourne: Jun 28, 2014

 

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has encouraged umpires and referees to identify bowlers with suspect illegal action.

 

“The ICC Board noted with concern the number of bowlers with suspect illegal bowling actions currently playing cricket and noted the recommendations of the ICC Cricket Committee and the Chief Executives’ Committee (CEC) to revise processes to encourage umpires and referees to identify suspect bowlers with greater confidence,” the ICC noted at its two-day Annual Conference which concluded in Melbourne on Saturday.

 

The ICC asked the umpires and referees “to use the expertise of bio-mechanics working in this area to assume a greater role during the assessment process and to allow for ongoing scrutiny of bowlers once they have been identified under the ICC procedures,” said an ICC statement issued in Melbourne.

 

It was also concurred that international venues must be set up to their maximum possible boundary dimensions, as per the playing conditions, to help maintain an appropriate balance between bat and ball.

 

The CEC also approved a few major playing condition changes for international cricket which will come into effect from October 1.

 

One of these changes stipulates that if a bowler has spent time off the field in a Test, he will be allowed to resume bowling after he has either spent the same period of time on the field as he spent off the field or he has been back on the field for 30 overs, whichever occurs first.

 

The second change was that a Twenty20 International innings will last 85 minutes instead of 80. Finally, it was also decided to extend for another 12 months the trial regulation allowing an 80-over top-up of unsuccessful Decision Review System (DRS) player reviews.