Kevin Pietersen © Getty Images
Kevin Pietersen © Getty Images

 

Jul 8, 2014

 

Former England batsman Kevin Pietersen on Tuesday said the English side is losing home advantage by preparing placid tracks, and new drainage systems in various grounds in the country are not helping their cause. India are set to take on England in a five-match series with the first Test starting on Wednesday at Nottingham, Trent Bridge.

 

Pietersen wrote in his column in The Telegraph, “Home advantage was lost when new drainage systems were installed at Test venues turning our pitches into sandpits. They are horrendous. They give little to the seamers and when it spins, it does so slowly, negating the threat of the turning ball.”

 

He added, “To try to solve the problem groundsmen are leaving more grass on the pitches but it is not making a difference. The drainage was addressed with the best of intentions; to give the public as much cricket as possible by reducing the amount of overs lost to rain. The sand drinks away all the juice so play can resume quickly after a rain break.”

 

Pietersen said things have changed drastically in English cricket since 2011, the year when India were beaten 4-0. He said, “It is good news for chief executives running grounds carrying the burden of heavy debts but in terms of the quality of cricket the public are seeing, it is not good enough. It is helping the grounds financially but is it helping the England cricket team? I do not think so. It is something that has really changed since India were beaten here 4-0 three years ago.”

Former England batsman Kevin Pietersen on Tuesday said the English side is losing home advantage by preparing placid tracks, and new drainage systems in various grounds in the country are not helping their cause. India are set to take on England in a five-match series with the first Test starting on Wednesday at Nottingham, Trent Bridge.

Pietersen wrote in his column in The Telegraph, “Home advantage was lost when new drainage systems were installed at Test venues turning our pitches into sandpits. They are horrendous. They give little to the seamers and when it spins, it does so slowly, negating the threat of the turning ball.”

He added, “To try to solve the problem groundsmen are leaving more grass on the pitches but it is not making a difference. The drainage was addressed with the best of intentions; to give the public as much cricket as possible by reducing the amount of overs lost to rain. The sand drinks away all the juice so play can resume quickly after a rain break.”

Pietersen said things have changed drastically in English cricket since 2011, the year when India were beaten 4-0. He said, “It is good news for chief executives running grounds carrying the burden of heavy debts but in terms of the quality of cricket the public are seeing, it is not good enough. It is helping the grounds financially but is it helping the England cricket team? I do not think so. It is something that has really changed since India were beaten here 4-0 three years ago.”