Sachin Tendulkar (above) said he had great admiration for Viv Richards, but decided to play his own game rather than emulating the West Indies legend © AFP
Sachin Tendulkar (above) said he had great admiration for Viv Richards, but decided to play his own game rather than emulating the West Indies legend © AFP

 

Mumbai: Mar 14, 2014

 

The creator of a plethora of world records in Tests and One-Day Internationals (ODIs) Sachin Tendulkar said he admired West Indies legend Viv Richards but decided not to emulate him after an unsuccessful attempt.

 

“I did watch once [a video of] Vivian Richards’s technique the previous evening [before] going into bat. I was trying to pull everything and hook everything. That is when I decided I am just going to watch, but not try and emulate, and that in the next innings, I needed to play the way I know,” Tendulkar said in Mumbai.

 

“They always will be your heroes and heroes would continue to be your heroes in whatever stage of life you are in. You have immense regard for them. It is always nice to watch their innings, but one thing I knew was that I should not try to play like that.”

 

Tendulkar said during his intense practise sessions he concentrated on things that ultimately led to his own satisfaction.

 

“Sometimes I was happy when I played just 25 balls. I knew that everything was absolutely fine. I need not complicate things. And that is when I wouldn’t push myself and bowl to others and work with other players.

 

“If I felt I should work on my forward defence, then I would work on my forward defence. It was all about what my heart told me. It was all about my satisfaction.

 

“So many things are judged by others. The performance, the number of runs scored (etc) can be judged from outside, but satisfaction is always judged from within. No one else would know and only I would know whether I was satisfied or not. It all boiled down to that.”

 

“I remember once we went to New Zealand and were playing a couple of T20 games before the ODI series started. I requested Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) that I will go with the team and practise there for six to seven days. And I requested Gary Kirsten [then coach] to put up a bowling machine.

 

“So whatever number of deliveries the entire team batted, I batted the same number of deliveries facing bowling machines, by myself. It was about my own satisfaction and not the number of hours or minutes or the number of balls that I faced,” he explained.

 

(With inputs from PTI)