Dale Steyn is keen on winning the World Cup and shedding the chokers tag © Getty Images
A tally of 281 runs at 140.50 and a strike rate of 122.2 to go with 17 wickets at 20.58: few have dominated a World Cup the way Lance Klusener did in 1999 © Getty Images

Few have dominated a World Cup to the extent Lance Klusener had in World Cup 1999. A tally of 281 runs at 140.50 and strike rate of 122.20 to go with 17 wickets at 20.58 (he was the leading wicket-taker for South Africa, ahead of Allan Donald and Shaun Pollock) were not only outstanding in the tournament, it would rank as one of the greatest series performances in the history of One-Day Internationals (ODIs). It was not surprising that they named him Man of the Series.

It is unfortunate that he is often remembered as the man who was involved in the mix-up with Donald in the semi-final at Edgbaston in what has been called the greatest ODI of all time. Had Klusener been promoted that day, the World Cup may have gone to a different side, though it must be admitted that Australia had put up a stellar show in the final at Lord’s.

Speaking of the two matches, one cannot forget Shane Warne. Not only did Warne emulate Mohinder Amarnath (1983) and Aravinda de Silva (1996) to win the Man of the Match in both the semi-final and the final of a World Cup, he also finished as the joint-highest wicket taker of the tournament with 20 wickets. Tied with him was Geoff Allott, one of the surprise packages of the tournament.

As for batting, Rahul Dravid topped the runs chart, with the Waugh twins featuring quite high. Dravid and Saeed Anwar scored two hundreds each, Mark Waugh became the first batsman to register four World Cup hundreds, and Saqlain Mushtaq took the second World Cup hat-trick (the first in 12 years).

Batting records

Though Dravid did not top-score in a single match (even when he scored his two hundreds at Bristol and Taunton) he finished as the leading scorer of the tournament. His 461 was 63 runs clear of Steve Waugh, the next man on the list.

 Most runs M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Rahul Dravid 8 8 1 461 539 145 65.86 85.5 2 3
Steve Waugh 10 8 3 398 512 120* 79.60 77.7 1 2
Sourav Ganguly 7 7  – 379 467 183 54.14 81.2 1 1
Mark Waugh 10 10 1 375 492 104 41.67 76.2 1 2
Saeed Anwar 10 10 1 368 511 113 40.89 72.0 2  –

Though Klusener dominated the batting averages, Ridley Jacobs provided him with competition. Used as an opener, Jacobs even carried his bat through an all-out innings against Australia at Old Trafford. He finished with 205 runs at 102.

Highest batting averages (150 or more runs)

M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Lance Klusener 9 8 6 281 230 52* 140.50 122.2 2
Ridley Jacobs 5 4 2 205 408 80* 102.50 50.2 2
Steve Waugh 10 8 3 398 512 120* 79.60 77.7 1 2
Roger Twose 9 9 5 318 426 80* 79.50 74.6 3
Rahul Dravid 8 8 1 461 539 145 65.86 85.5 2 3

Though the first half of the summer was relatively sedate, Klusener and Moin Khan, both batting down the order, took the bowlers to cleaners. While Klusener’s 281 came off a mere 230 balls, Moin’s 242 came off 219. Klusener still had a gap, but Moin was a deserving second.

Highest strike rates (150 or more runs)

  M I NO R BF HS Ave SR 100s 50s
Lance Klusener 9 8 6 281 230 52* 140.50 122.2 2
Moin Khan 10 9 2 242 219 63 34.57 110.5 1
Sachin Tendulkar 7 7 1 253 281 140* 42.17 90.0 1
Jonty Rhodes 9 8 2 161 182 43 26.83 88.5  –
Rahul Dravid 8 8 1 461 539 145 65.86 85.5 2 3

There were 11 centuries in the tournament, and one of the most striking features was the fact that Indians (Sachin Tendulkar, Dravid — twice, Ganguly, and Ajay Jadeja) scored the first five of them. Ganguly, Dravid, and Tendulkar were also the top three scorers of World Cup 1999.

Centurions Score Against Venue
Sourav Ganguly 183 Sri Lanka Taunton
Rahul Dravid 145 Sri Lanka Taunton
Sachin Tendulkar 140* Kenya Bristol
Neil Johnson 132* Australia Lord’s
Steve Waugh 120* South Africa Headingley
Saeed Anwar 113* New Zealand Old Trafford
Rahul Dravid 104* Kenya Bristol
Mark Waugh 104 Zimbabwe Lord’s
Saeed Anwar 103 Zimbabwe The Oval
Herschelle Gibbs 101 Australia Headingley
Ajay Jadeja 100* Australia The Oval

Bowling records

The bowlers had better outings than in the previous three World Cups. With 20 wickets at 16.25, Geoff Allott was the surprise package; other seamers put up competent performances as well, though both Shane Warne and Saqlain Mushtaq bowled exceptionally well, picking up 37 cheap wickets between them.

 Most Wickets B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Geoff Allott 526 325 20 4/37 16.25 26.3 3.71
Shane Warne 566 361 20 4/29 18.05 28.3 3.83
Glenn McGrath 574 361 18 5/14 20.06 31.9 3.77 1
Lance Klusener 455 350 17 5/21 20.59 26.8 4.62 1
Saqlain Mushtaq 502 379 17 5/35 22.29 29.5 4.53 1

Had cricket been only for the bowlers, Walsh (11 wickets at 9.82) would probably have taken West Indies to the next level with some support from Curtly Ambrose and Rion King. The English seamers, Darren Gough and Alan Mullally, did a good job, as did Allott and Warne.

Best bowling averages (10 wickets or more)

B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Courtney Walsh 282 108 11 4/25 9.82 25.6 2.30
Geoff Allott 526 325 20 4/37 16.25 26.3 3.71
Darren Gough 292 192 11 4/34 17.45 26.5 3.95
Alan Mullally 300 176 10 4/37 17.60 30.0 3.52
Shane Warne 566 361 20 4/29 18.05 28.3 3.83

John Blain (ten wickets at 22.3 per ball) was the surprising leader on the strike rates chart, while Neil Johnson, with 25 balls per wicket, was one of the key reasons for Zimbabwe making it to the Super Sixes.

Best bowling strike rates (10 wickets or more)

  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
John Blain 223 210 10 4/37 21.00 22.3 5.65
Neil Johnson 300 233 12 4/42 19.42 25.0 4.66
Courtney Walsh 282 108 11 4/25 9.82 25.6 2.30
Geoff Allott 526 325 20 4/37 16.25 26.3 3.71
Darren Gough 292 192 11 4/34 17.45 26.5 3.95

To give an example of how good the West Indian fast bowlers were, both Walsh and Ambrose conceded less than 2.50 runs an over, while King gave away a shade over three; they also topped the economy rates chart. The next two names, Shaun Pollock and Gavin Larsen, were predictable ones.

Best economy rates (100 or more balls)

  B R W BB Ave SR Econ 5WIs
Courtney Walsh 282 108 11 4/25 9.82 25.6 2.30
Curtly Ambrose 240 94 7 3/31 13.43 34.3 2.35
Rion King 187 95 8 3/30 11.88 23.4 3.05
Shaun Pollock 504 283 9 5/36 31.44 56.0 3.37 1
Gavin Larsen 456 263 6 3/19 43.83 76.0 3.46

The past three World Cups had seen a mere four five-wicket hauls, but this one surpassed all of them put together. As expected, Klusener and Saqlain featured on the list, as did Robin Singh, Venkatesh Prasad, Pollock, and Glenn McGrath.

Five-wicket hauls

  Figures Against Venue
Glenn McGrath 5/14 West Indies Old Trafford
Lance Klusener 5/21 Kenya Amstelveen
Venkatesh Prasad 5/27 Pakistan Old Trafford
Robin Singh 5/31 Sri Lanka Taunton
Saqlain Mushtaq 5/35 Bangladesh Northampton
Shaun Pollock 5/36 Australia Edgbaston

It had taken four World Cups for Chetan Sharma to take the first hat-trick in World Cups. It took Saqlain Mushtaq three more for the second; he had Henry Olonga and Adam Huckle stumped, and followed it by trapping Mpumelelo Mbangwa leg-before.

Hat-tricks

  Against Venue Batsmen How out
Saqlain Mushtaq Zimbabwe The Oval Henry Olonga stumped Moin Khan
Adam Huckle stumped Moin Khan
Mpumelelo Mbangwa LBW

Fielding and wicket-keeping

Moin topping the list was never a surprise, but despite having played half the number of matches played by Moin and Gilchrist, Jacobs finished second with a whopping 14 dismissals (all caught) from only five matches.

Most dismissals by a wicket-keeper

  M C S D D/M
Moin Khan 10 12 4 16 1.60
Ridley Jacobs 5 14 14 2.80
Adam Gilchrist 10 12 2 14 1.40
Mark Boucher 9 11 11 1.22
Nayan Mongia 7 8 1 9 1.29

Darryl Cullinan claimed eight catches from nine matches, but nobody else managed more than six — a count where seven men (including the Waugh twins) were tied.

Most catches as fielder

  M C C/M
Darryl Cullinan 9 8 0.89
Graeme Hick 5 6 1.20
Graham Thorpe 5 6 1.20
Nathan Astle 9 6 0.67
Inzamam-ul-Haq 10 6 0.60
Ricky Ponting 10 6 0.60
Mark Waugh 10 6 0.60
Steve Waugh 10 6 0.60

Record partnerships

Dravid added an unbroken 237 with Tendulkar against at Kenya, and bettered that with a 318-run stand with Ganguly against Sri Lanka at Taunton. The latter still remains a World Cup record for any wicket. Klusener features in two record stands, for the ninth and tenth wickets respectively.

Highest partnerships

Wicket Runs Batsman 1 Batsman 2 Against Venue
1 194 Saeed Anwar Wajahatullah Wasti New Zealand Old Trafford
2 318 Sourav Ganguly Rahul Dravid Sri Lanka Taunton
3 237* Rahul Dravid Sachin Tendulkar Kenya Bristol
4 126 Ricky Ponting Steve Waugh South Africa Headingley
5 148 Roger Twose Chris Cairns Australia Cardiff
6 161 Maurice Odumbe Alpesh Vadher Sri Lanka Southampton
7 83 Stephen Fleming Chris Harris Pakistan Derby
8 64 Mahela Jayawardene Chaminda Vaas Kenya Southampton
9 44 Lance Klusener Steve Elworthy Sri Lanka Northampton
10 35 Lance Klusener Allan Donald Zimbabwe Chelmsford

Team aggregates

India scored 373 for six against Sri Lanka at Taunton and 329 for two against Kenya against Bristol, which remained the highest in the World Cup. Australia, with 303 for four against Zimbabwe at Lord’s, were the only other side to score in excess of 300.

Highest team scores

Team Score Against Venue
India 373/6 (50) Sri Lanka Taunton
India 329/2 (50) Kenya Bristol
Australia 303/4 (50) Zimbabwe Lord’s
South Africa 287/5 (50) New Zealand Edgbaston
Australia 282/6 (50) India The Oval

West Indies skittled out Scotland for 68 at Grace Road to win the match before lunch. The South African pace battery bowled out England for 103 at The Oval and Sri Lanka for 110 at Northampton, and Australia bowled out West Indies for 110 in a crunch match at Old Trafford.

Lowest team scores (excludes rain-reduced matches)

Team Score Against Venue
Scotland 68 (31.3) West Indies Grace Road
England 103 (41) South Africa The Oval
Sri Lanka 110 (35.2) South Africa Northampton
West Indies 110 (46.4) Australia Old Trafford
Bangladesh 116 (37.4) New Zealand Chelmsford

Biggest margins of victory

By runs: 157

India 373/6 (50) beat Sri Lanka 216 (42.3)

By wickets: 9

Kenya 203 (49.4) lost to England 204/1 (39)

New Zealand 241/7 (50) lost to Pakistan 242/1 (47.3)

By balls to spare: 239

Scotland 68 (31.3) lost to West Indies 70/2 (10.1)

Smallest margins of victory

By runs: 3

Zimbabwe 252 for 9 (50) beat India 249 (45) — target 253 from 46 overs

By wickets: 3

Pakistan 220 for 7 (50) lost to South Africa 221/7 (49)

By balls to spare: 2

South Africa 271 for 7 (50) lost to Australia 272/5 (49.4)

Tie

Australia 213 (49.2) tied with South Africa 213 (49.4)

For tournament summary click here