Ashes 2013: Allan Border criticises decision to send David Warner to Africa

David Warner (above), who was suspended from the Ashes warm-up matches for punching England batsman Joe Root in a Birmingham bar, lost his place to Steven Smith, who will be playing as the No 5 batsman © Getty Images

Melbourne: Jul 16, 2013
 
Former Australian Test skipper Allan Border feels David Warner’s exclusion from Ashes series and being sent off to Australia A’s tour of Africa defies logic. Border furthermore added that the swashbuckling opener should be gearing up for Ashes recall in the Australian nets.
 
“It defies belief David Warner is about to leave the Ashes tour for an Australia A tour of Africa,” Border wrote in Daily Telegraph reports Times of India.
 
“I get the thinking, send him to South Africa and Zimbabwe to find form and bring him back later in the series, but I strongly disagree with it,” he added.
 
“Unless [James] Jimmy Anderson bobs up in the Zimbabwe side, Warner scoring runs won’t count for anything.”
 
Border wrote Warner will be better off facing Australian pacers. He added facing situations in England will be far more challenging than in Africa.
 
“He would be far better served facing [Australia pacer] James Pattinson in the nets. The standard of bowling he will face in Africa and the conditions will be chalk and cheese to the challenges that await him in England.”

Warner, who was suspended from the warm-up matches for punching England batsman Joe Root in a Birmingham bar, lost his place to Steven Smith, who will be playing as the No 5 batsman. Warner was overlooked due to his lack of match practice.
 
Earlier, speaking on the eve of his departure from London, Warner, 26, spoke of his devastation at not being selected to play the first Ashes Test, saying he “kind of broke down” when he told his mum.

“[It’s] massive to miss a Test. As a kid growing up, you want to play in the Ashes and after that incident I went back to my room and I was pretty shattered for a week and a half, two weeks. I still feel the guilt of what happened. I feel myself it’s led to me being in this situation at the moment,” he said.

“Things would have been different, I would have been able to play those warm-up games and I could have pressed my claims to play in that first Test but that’s me. I put my hand up and accepted the consequences and now it’s about me trying to put as many runs on the board in these next two games [in Harare and Pretoria] and press forward.”