Australia-New Zealand World Cup match under ICC scanner

Shane Watson and Brad Haddin against New Zealand

Australia-New Zealand World Cup match under ICC scanner

Dubai: Mar 1, 2011

The Australia and New Zealand World Cup match played in Ahmedabad has come under The International Cricket Council (ICC) scanner after Australian openers, Shane Watson and Brad Haddin batted slowly in the first 10 overs.

According to sources, the ICC ACSU scrutinised the match after questions were raised over the slow start made by Watson and Haddin. The two openers scored just 28 in 11 overs and 53 in 15 overs in a match that Australia eventually won comfortably. ICC anti-corruption unit also reviewed the slow rate of scoring in the first two overs.

With the cloud of spot-fixing now looming large over international cricket following the bans on three Pakistani players for spot-fixing last year on the England tour, sources said the ICC ASCU was keeping a vigilant eye on all matches in the World Cup and the slow start by the Australian openers caught their attention.

“They are taking no chances at all and all matches are under the scanner for possible indications that any spot-fixing has taken place,” one source said.

Pictures Getty Images

Dubai: Mar 1, 2011

Australia and New Zealand World Cup match played in Ahmedabad has come under The International Cricket Council (ICC) scanner after Australian openers, Shane Watson and Brad Haddin batted slowly in the first 10 overs.

According to sources, the ICC ACSU scrutinised the match after questions were raised over the slow start made by Watson and Haddin. The two openers scored just 28 in 11 overs and 53 in 15 overs in a match that Australia eventually won comfortably. ICC anti-corruption unit also reviewed the slow rate of scoring in the first two overs.

With the cloud of spot-fixing now looming large over international cricket following the bans on three Pakistani players for spot-fixing last year on the England tour, sources said the ICC ASCU was keeping a vigilant eye on all matches in the World Cup and the slow start by the Australian openers caught their attention.

“They are taking no chances at all and all matches are under the scanner for possible indications that any spot-fixing has taken place,” one source said.

Pictures Getty Images