Eoin Morgan, England vs West Indies, England, West Indies, World Cup, ICC World Cup 2019
Given that rain has washed out most number of matches this time at the World Cup, talk about having reserve days has grown louder. @ ICC

Rain has unfortunately taken centrestage in the ongoing ICC World Cup 2019 with inclement weather washing out as many as four matches, including Thursday’s India-New Zealand game, which is all set to be abandoned.

Hosts England meanwhile haven’t been witness to a washed out match yet, but captain Eoin Morgan is confident that rain will not be the reason to England reaching the semi-finals.

“I don’t think the rain will be the reason we don’t make the semi-finals. I think today’s probably the last of the significant rain for the next few days. I know the last three days I think haven’t been great for sides trying to get games in,” Morgan said on the eve of England’s clash against West Indies at Southampton where scattered showers is predicted on the day.

“But at some stage during the tournament we will be hit by a small bit of rain. It’s great that it’s not too much and, hopefully, it doesn’t impact one team more than twice.” ALSO READ: Rain and injuries headline grim week in England, with more frustration ahead

Given that rain has washed out most number of matches this time at the World Cup, talk about having reserve days has grown louder.

“Yes, I do think it is fair,” Morgan replied when asked if it’s fair not to have reserve days. “The tournament is quite a long tournament as it is. I think to have reserve days in the group stages is too much. I do think later in the tournament they are necessary, but for group stage games it’s part and parcel of being anywhere in the world the fact that it might rain at some stage.”

Meanwhile, Morgan weighed in on the zing bails debate which has also been one of the major talking points. India and Australia captains Virat Kohli and Aaron Finch collectively voiced their displeasure after their match on June 9 at the Kennington Oval in London.

“More so surprised that when the ball’s hit the actual stump with full contact as opposed to clip. The ball has clipped the stumps for years and made a noise and guys have been given out caught behind. That’s happened a lot in the past,” Morgan said.

“I think with the benefit of the unbelievable cameras that are around now you spot that. But more surprised about when the ball hits the stumps, like it trickles back with spin and hits it, yeah.

“It’s fine. I don’t know how long the Zing bails and the stumps have been around now. But it’s like any new gadget. The more you play, the more problems you see than the benefit of it.”