Haddin wants consistency in use of DRS

There were two caught behind appeals in the second Test between Australia and Sri Lanka on Sunday. One was given out and other not out which highlighted the inconsistency of the DRS system AFP

By Cricket Country Staff

Pallekele: Sep 12, 2011

Australia wicketkeeper Brad Haddin feels the technology should be the consistently used in Tests all over the world. Haddin’s remarks come after the usage of Decision Review System (DRS) in the ongoing Test series between Australia and Sri Lanka has come under scanner after a series of inconsistencies.

Australian opener Phil Hughes was given a controversial decision on review to an LBW decision where the ball was shown to be keeping a straight line on a predicted despite the fact the ball had clearly turned and changed direction in Galle.

There were two caught behind appeals in the second Test between Australia and Sri Lanka on Sunday. One was given out and other not out which highlighted the inconsistency of the DRS system.

Haddin, who was involved in both the caught-behind dismissals insisted that the batsmen was out but were given out because of inconsistent DRS. He believes lack of hot-spot cameras creates inconsistency in use of DRS.

Haddin was quoted in The West Australia as saying, “My opinion on it is that I think it needs to be consistent all around the world,” Haddin said of the system, which currently is used in differing ways from series to series depending on the technology available and the particular demands of the teams competing.

“I think it needs to be the same. I don’t think you can chop and change from series to series.

“I think if you’ve got the technology there you might as well use it and if not don’t use it at all and leave it up to the umpires.”

Sri Lanka batsman Kumar Sangakkara believes DRS is bound to have its pros and cons. He was quoted by The West Australian, “We’ve seen the good and the bad of it. We’ve seen Hawk-Eye not picking up on turn, depending on the distance where the ball pitches and where it hits the pad. You’ve seen hot-spot sometimes fail in the India-England series, so the debate will go on.

“We saw Paranvitana given not out on the field and overturned by the third umpire, so that’ll probably be another point of debate.”

He further emphasised on having a general consensus on the use of technology for the game’s betterment.

“I think everybody’s got to come to a middle ground, where you’ve got to accept that it’s not 100 per cent if you’re using it and be comfortable with that, or go back and say we’ll wait until technology is 100 per cent,” said the veteran batsman.