The Feroz Shah Kotla pitch is the same venue where a match between India and Sri Lanka was abandoned because of 'dangerous pitch' © Getty Images (Representation Image)
The Feroz Shah Kotla pitch is the same venue where a match between India and Sri Lanka was abandoned because of ‘dangerous pitch’ © Getty Images (Representation Image)

The Delhi and District Cricket Association (DDCA) have suffered a major setback in the preparation for ICC World T20 2016 as the association staff have gone on an indefinite strike owing to dispute on bonus payments. This news came after DDCA did its utmost best and obtained the occupancy certificate from the South Delhi Municipal Corporation and No objection certificate from the Delhi Urban Art Commission. What’s more worrying is the fact that the tournament is just nine days away and there seems to be no sign of compromise between the DDCA and the association staff. The Feroz Shah Kotla pitch is the same venue where a match between India and Sri Lanka was abandoned because of ‘dangerous pitch.’ READ: BCCI to assess DDCA preparations for ICC World T20 2016

With an expected team from ICC scheduled to look at the conditions on March 8, it is very necessary the conflict is solved and work is completed.
According to CricBuzz, one of the sources close to the situation said, “The staff met the top DDCA officials on Saturday but things have not been sorted. The staff has been told that their demand is unacceptable and the DDCA can do little about it.”

“They [the staff] signed an agreement with SP Bansal, the DDCA president, in which it was decided that they will get a bonus despite DDCA being a non-profit making company. They are now demanding for a bonus of Rs 32,000 across the board which is unacceptable.We told them we honour their deal and pay them Rs 14,000 that too in arbitration. But they refuse to budge as they have been instigated to twist our arms right before the World T20,” Ravinder Manchanda, the DDCA treasurer said.

Considering the importance of the tournament and repercussions it can have on the future of international matches in Delhi, it is inevitable that a solution is found. When asked what can be done, he said, “The biggest concern is to get the ground ready. 75 percent of the ground staff is permanent and the rest have to look into the civil work as well. Around five or six groundsmen are temporary. It will be a big challenge if they have to make do with only a half a dozen groundsmen.”