New Zealand immigration authority’s official website states, "People with criminal convictions or who have provided false or misleading information will not be granted a visa unless a character waiver is granted © Getty Images
Mohammad Aamer’s five-year ban came to an end on September 1, 2015 © Getty Images

Mohammad Aamer, Pakistan’s tainted fast bowler may have to wait a little longer to get into Pakistan’s national team as it is getting difficult for him to get a visa for New Zealand tour next month. It is because New Zealand immigration authority’s official website states, “People with criminal convictions or who have provided false or misleading information will not be granted a visa unless a character waiver is granted. In the case of character waivers, each application is considered on its individual merits and taking into account, for example, the seriousness of an offence, number of offences and how long ago the event/s occurred.” Meanwhile, Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is seeking legal advice on how to get Aamer a visa so that he can get inducted in the team’s squad for the tour to New Zealand in January 2016. Inzamam-ul-Haq: Mohammad Aamer’s inclusion will be fruitful for Pakistan’s future

In 2014, Aamer’s visa for England was cancelled and PCB feels that the same may occur again for New Zealand tour too. A report by ESPNcricinfo says that PCB is seeking legal help from England and Aamer’s lawyer has been kept on board if some proofs are needed to be provided. Aamer recently completed his rehabilitation programme. Earlier, Aamer’s ban imposed on him by the International Cricket Council (ICC) came to an end on September 1, 2015 for his involvement in spot-fixing around five years back. He also served a jail term for three month at that time. READ: Mohammad Aamer’s return to Pakistan side dented by selectors resistance

Aamer, Salman Butt and Mohammad Asif had to appear before a London court in November 2011 for their alleged involvement in spot-fixing. A sting operation had brought to the surface that the trio had accepted money in exchange for bowling no-balls on purpose in a Test match against England in 2010. Aamer was sentenced to a five-year ban after his charges were found to be true.