Ravichandran Ashwin and Kuldeep Yadav. @ PTI

India’s veteran offspinner Harbhajan Singh has endorsed head coach Ravi Shastri’s viewpoint which states that wrist spinner will be entertained more than finger spinners. Shastri revealed recently that Chinaman Kuldeep Yadav is miles higher in the pecking order than Ravichandran Ashwin, who last played a Test for India against Australia in December 2018 at Adelaide.

“With what Ravi bhai (Shastri) has said about Kuldeep being your no.1 spinner in overseas conditions, I think the team is now going to that zone where they are looking for wicket taking options,” Harbhajan, second in the all-time list of India’s highest wicket-takers in Tests, was quoted as saying by India Today on Wednesday. (ALSO READ: Now, Kuldeep Yadav will be our No.1 overseas spinner: Coach Ravi Shastri indicates shift in plan)

“Look, R Ashwin started off so well in England and was a joy to watch in the first Test, but he lost his way as the series progressed and Moeen Ali overshadowed him. It’s a tough call but I am sure it’s in the best interest of the team,” he said.

What has gone against Ashwin has been his poor record overseas. “Ashwin’s home record is impressive, but his overseas record is not the same. That’s why the team management seem to think Kuldeep should be preferred over Ashwin,” Harbhajan said. (ALSO READ: ‘If I must replace Kuldeep or Chahal, I’ll pick Ravichandran Ashwin for the World Cup’)

“Kuldeep Yadav made most of the opportunity he got. To get five wickets away like he did at Sydney is no mean task. I think Ravindra Jadeja did well too by performing at Melbourne, Sydney and at the Oval in England. So, I think this spin duo could take things forward from here,” he added.

The Turbanator agreed with Shastri, also a left-arm spinner in his time, that wrist spinners will have the edge compared to finger spinners. (ALSO READ: We were outplayed in all three departments: Rohit Sharma)

“Wrist spinners are in demand simply because they have more variations. You have a leg spinner, a googly, a flipper and top spinner. Then of course you have other small variations like deceiving in the flight,” he said.

“Talking about finger spinners, if you are an off spinner who does not have a ‘doosra’ or a caroom ball or a ball that goes away, your difficulty will compound. Unless you are a Muralitharan who would spin so big that you know runs will only come from the leg side because if the batsmen tries to hit through the off side it will still create wicket taking opportunities. To survive in today’s cricket, you need more than one variation,” he explained.