Nasser Hussain added he knows that is a big comment but there is hardly any England batsman who could do what Joe Root does © Getty Images
Nasser Hussain added he knows that is a big comment but there is hardly any England batsman who could do what Joe Root (above) does © Getty Images

Joe Root, who smashed a blistering knock of 83 runs off just 44 balls and helped England win against South Africa in T20 World Cup 2016 was lauded by former skipper Nasser Hussain. According to Hussain, Root is the finest batsman England has ever produced across all formats. Hussain believes no other batsman of Root’s calibre has ever emerged from the nation who has been so consistent in all the three formats of the game— Tests, ODIs and T20I cricket. Root has an astonishing Test and ODI average of 54.93 and 44.34 respectively. His T20I strike rate is 140.82 and he still maintains an average of 39.66. Full Cricket Scorecard: South Africa vs England, ICC World T20 2016, Match 18 at Mumbai

Hussain was quoted by Cricket Australia’s official website speaking to Sky Sports, “He is the best England batsman across all forms of cricket ever. I know that is a big comment but can you name another batsman who could do what he does as well as him? People were asking where Root’s place was in England’s T20 side a while ago but he strikes it a similar rate as Jos Buttler, who is this legendary T20 player. He just does it in a different way – with Jos you know he is striking it well, whereas with Joe he has 40 off 20 and you wonder how he has done it. ” ALSO READ: Joe Root equals Virender Sehwag unique record

“He is our best player, a star, and will only get better – these are the best years of his life. It’s one thing chasing 230 when it’s your first game and there is another tomorrow but another when if you lose the game you are probably out. England showed a lot of bottle and the 40-odd runs that Hales and Roy put on, which won’t get much of a mention, got them off to flyer that South Africa couldn’t come back from. The bowling was horrendous, though – England bowled too wide and South Africa bowled too straight. The batting in limited-over cricket has gone up exponentially – the 360 shots played are unimaginable – but the bowling is no better than it was a decade ago, perhaps because of the pressure put on bowlers by batsmen.”