Wasim Akram Opens Up About Cocaine Addiction, Reveals He Was Kept In Rehab Against His Will

Wasim Akram Opens Up About Cocaine Addiction, Reveals He Was Kept In Rehab Against His Will

Wasim Akram in his biography revealed that he got addicted to cocaine post retirement from cricket.

Updated: November 26, 2022 1:55 PM IST | Edited By: CricketCountry Staff
Karachi: Former Pakistan pacer Wasim Akram stunned his fans when he opened up about his cocaine addiction post retirement. Akram in his biography, Sultan: A Memoir, revealed that he got addicted to cocaine after retirement from cricket. Now, Akram has made another shocking revelation, disclosing that was kept in rehab in Pakistan for two and a half months against his will. Akram revealed that there was a time when he couldn't socialise without the use of drugs and when his wife Huma found out about his addiction, she suggested Akram to go to the rehab centre. However, things didn't go as planned as Akram was forcefully kept in the rehabilitation centre. "In England, somebody at a party said 'you wanna try it?' I was retired, I said 'yea'h. Then one line became a gram. I came back to Pakistan. Nobody knew what it was but it was available. I realised, I couldn't function without it, which means I couldn't socialise without it. It got worse and worse. My kids were young. I was hurting my late wife a lot. We would have arguments. She said I need help. She said there's a rehab, you can go there. I said alright I will go there for a month but they kept me there for two and a half months against my will. Apparently, that is illegal in the world but not in Pakistan. That didn't help me. When I came out, a rebellion came into me. It's my money, I stayed in that horrible place against my will," Akram revealed in The Grade Cricketer podcast. Akram said that he had a different vision of rehab centres but what he saw in Pakistan was horrible. "In western movies, even in Australia you see rehabs have lovely big lawns, people give lectures, you go to gym. But I went to a place (in Pakistan) with a corridor and eight rooms, that's it. It was very very tough. It was a horrible time," he added.
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