Indian opening batsman Virender Sehwag scored record-breaking 219 runs off 149 balls against West Indies © AFP
Indian opening batsman Virender Sehwag scored record-breaking 219 runs off 149 balls against West Indies © AFP

 

By Dileep V

 

The year 2011 saw a sea of change with respect to One-Day Internationals (ODIs). It was a year in which India won the World Cup with fans showing insatiable thirst for the game, but by the time the year was ending, empty stands greeted the players of India and West Indies.

 

There has been a lot of talk about removing and revamping of ODIs coming from various quarters. The death of the ODI format was looming large at the start of the year, but the successful World Cup in the subcontinent killed that prospect. But that was the only bright spot, as low turn-outs at stadiums continued in most of the series throughout the year. But what hasn’t changed is the performance of players, with many batsmen and bowlers coming up with outstanding contributions.

 

CricketCountry picks the ODI team of the year, based purely on stats. The team consists of two openers, three middle-order batsmen, three fast bowlers, a spinner and a wicketkeeper.

 

While choosing the team of the year, emphasis is given on a particular player’s Average, Strike Rate, Economy, Team wins and dismissals. Runs scored and wickets taken are indicative, but are not definitive, and hence more weightage is given to other parameters. Though it would seem that runs scored, wickets taken and number of matches are omitted they are hidden under the parameters considered.

 

Three important numbers are calculated. The percentage of team wins Ratio (R) and dismissals per Innings called the Dismissal Ratio (DR) and finally a Quotient (Q) which is obtained by taking the Average, Strike rate, Economy, Ratio and the Dismissal ratio.

 

For the batsmen all the parameters are multiplied to get the Quotient since having a higher Average, SR etc indicates better performance. For the bowlers, it is divided since lesser Average, SR etc means they have fared better. Whereas, for wicketkeepers, catches taken and stumpings are also considered.

 

The nature of selection of team means a lot of top performers of the year will miss out due to their team not winning that many matches or either of their average or strike rate being considerably less.

 

Mohammad Hafeez scored more than 1000 runs in the season, but his low strike rate meant he missed out of the XI. Virender Sehwag’s double hundred meant he pushed Sachin Tendulkar and Hashim Amla for a place in the team along with the prolific Shane Watson.

 

Openers (Min: 500 Runs)

 

Player

Inns

Runs

Ave

SR

Wins

R

Q

Virender  Sehwag (India)

12

645

53.75

123.09

9

0.75

49.62

Shane Watson (Aus)

21

1124

59.15

108.49

16

0.76

48.89

Sachin Tendulkar (India)

11

513

46.63

88.60

8

0.73

30.05

Hashim Amla (SA)

15

632

45.14

88.02

9

0.60

23.84

Mohammad Hafeez (Pak)

32

1075

37.06

76.34

24

0.75

21.22

 

Virat Kohli, Kumar Sangakkara and Jonathan Trott amassed more than 1000 runs in the calendar year but still didn’t make it to the team as their team’s win percentage was far lower compared to the others. Rohit Sharma had three great series with the bat and his superior average saw him having the highest Quotient (Q) among the middle order batsmen. Though MS Dhoni would have made it to the squad as a pure batsman, he is considered as a wicket-keeper.

 

Middle order (Min: 500 runs)

 

Player

Inns

Runs

Ave

SR

Wins

R

Q

Rohit Sharma (India)

13

582

72.75

85.58

9

0.69

43.10

Michael Clarke (Aus)

22

900

56.25

79.64

17

0.77

34.61

MS Dhoni (India)

22

764

58.76

89.88

14

0.63

33.60

Ross Taylor (NZ)

13

561

51.00

84.74

9

0.69

29.91

Misbah-ul-Haq (Pak)

26

964

53.55

68.07

20

0.76

28.03

Gautam Gambhir (India)

15

562

40.14

86.86

12

0.80

27.89

Umar Akmal (Pak)

23

785

41.31

90.22

17

0.73

27.54

Virat Kohli (India)

34

1381

47.62

85.56

21

0.61

25.16

 

MS Dhoni had an amazing year, guiding India to the World Cup triumph after 28 years and also starring with the bat in the final. His wicket-keeping skills make him an additional all-rounder in the team and his leadership qualities means he wins the captaincy hands down.

 

Wicket-keeper (Min: 2500 runs; 10 dismissals)

 

Player

Inns

Runs

Bat Av

SR

Ct

St

Wins

R

DR

Q

MS Dhoni (India)

24

764

58.76

58.76

17

6

14

0.58

0.95

19.30

Kumar Sangakkara (SL)

27

1127

51.22

51.22

26

8

13

0.48

1.25

15.90

Kamran Akmal (Pak)

14

250

31.25

31.25

12

4

9

0.64

1.14

7.17

Mushfiqur Rahim (Ban)

20

527

32.93

32.93

15

8

6

0.30

1.15

3.74

T Taibu (Zim)

14

426

32.76

32.76

6

4

6

0.42

0.71

3.28

 

Lasith Malinga was last year’s leading wicket-taker with 48 wickets, but he finds himself out of the team. Sri Lanka’s win ratio of around 52% means Quotient (Q) is far less than others and ends up at No.8

 

Shahid Afridi and Saeed Ajmal have performed remarkably bowling in tandem and it was poetic justice that both ended up in the team. With only two other pace bowlers – Morne Morkel and Mitchell Johnson – in the team, Watson will serve as the back-up seamer.

 

Bowlers (Min: 25 wickets)

 

Player

Inns

Wkts

Ave

Econ

SR

wins

R

DR

Q

Saeed Ajmal (Pak)

20

34

17.08

3.48

29.4

16

0.80

1.70

4.57

Morne Morkel (SA)

14

26

17.65

4.46

23.7

8

0.57

1.85

3.06

Shahid Afridi (Pak)

26

45

20.82

4.18

29.8

19

0.73

1.73

2.81

M Johnson (Aus)

22

39

20.94

4.43

28.3

16

0.72

1.77

2.77

Brett Lee (Aus)

19

33

21.72

4.59

28.3

14

0.73

1.73

2.61

Dale Steyn (SA)

14

25

19.32

4.37

26.5

8

0.57

1.78

2.55

Zaheer Khan (India)

14

30

20.66

4.85

25.5

9

0.64

2.14

2.51

Lasith Malinga (SL)

23

48

19.25

4.8

24

12

0.52

2.08

2.35

 

The 2011 ODI XI

 

1. Virender Sehwag (India)

 

2. Shane Watson (Australia)

 

3. Rohit Sharma (India)

 

4. Michael Clarke (Australia)

 

5. Ross Taylor (New Zealand)

 

6. Misbah-ul Haq (Pakistan)

 

7. MS Dhoni (India – c & wk)

 

8. Shahid Afridi (Pakistan)

 

9. Mitchell Johnson (Australia)

 

10. Saeed Ajmal (Pakistan)

 

11. Morne Morkel (South Africa)

 

(Dileep.V is a Scouser fan, Sports freak, Movie buff, Laggard Quizzer and dreams of setting foot on Anfield one day)

 

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