Cheteshwar Pujara decided to play for Derbyshire after a poor showing in India's tour to England © Getty Images (File photo)
Cheteshwar Pujara decided to play for Derbyshire after a poor showing in India’s tour to England © Getty Images (File photo)

Cheteshwar Pujara entered the history books as he became the 59th batsman to be dismissed handling the ball. He was dismissed while playing for Derbyshire against Leicestershire in a County Championship Division Two match at Derby. Varun Arora looks at the laws regarding Handling the ball, and lists out the players who have been dismissed that way. 

Cheteshwar Pujara was batting on 6 when he was dismissed facing left-arm seamer Atif Sheikh. He faced 21 balls during his 28 minute stay at the crease. He now joins Mohinder Amarnath who was the first Indian to be dismissed handling the ball in an ODI against Australia in 1986.

Before Pujara, Evin Lewis of Trinidad and Tobago was dismissed in similar fashion when he was playing against Leeward Island in March 2014 at Port of Spain.

Handling the ball is a rare method of dismissal in first-class cricket. The law has laid down the following conditions when a batsman can be dismissed through handling the ball. Below are the conditions on the basis of which it is decided whether the batsman is Out or Not out handling the ball according to Lords.org.

Law 33 (Handled the ball)

1. Out Handled the ball

The striker is out Handled the ball if, except in the circumstances of 2 below, in the act of playing a ball delivered by the bowler, he wilfully strikes the ball with a hand not holding the bat.  This will apply whether no-ball has been called or not and whether it is the first strike or a second or subsequent strike.

The act of playing the ball shall also encompass both playing at the ball and striking the ball more than once in defence of his wicket.

2. Not out Handled the ball

Notwithstanding 1 above,

(a) the striker will not be out Handled the ball if the strike with a hand not holding the bat is in order to avoid injury.

(b) the striker will not be out Handled the ball but will be liable to be out Obstructing the field if he makes a strike with a hand not holding the bat

(i) unless trying to avoid injury, as a lawful second or subsequent strike which prevents a catch.  See Law 37.3 (Obstructing a ball from being caught).

(ii) unless trying to avoid injury, after he has completed the act of playing the ball, as defined in 1 above.

(iii)  at any time while the ball is in play, to return the ball to any fielder, without the consent of a fielder.  See Law 37.4 (Returning the ball to a fielder).

3. Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.

The most recent dismissals through this method have been listed below.

GA Gooch

England v Australia

Manchester

1993

AC Waller

Mashonaland CD v Mashonaland Under-24

Harare

1994-95

KM Krikken

Derbyshire v Indians

Derby

1996

A Badenhorst

Eastern Province B v North West

Fochville

1998-99

SR Waugh

Australia v India

Chennai

2000-01

MP Vaughan

England v India

Bangalore

2001-02

Tushar Imran

Bangladesh A v Jamaica

Spanish Town

2001-2002

Al Sahariar

Dhaka v Chittagong

Dhaka

2003-04

Junaid Zia

Rawalpindi v Lahore

Lahore

2003-04

DJ Watson

Dolphins v Eagles

Bloemfontein

2004-05

M Zondecki

Cape Cobras v Eagles

Bloemfontein

2006-07

LN Mosena

Free State v Limpopo

Bloemfontein

2007-08

WSA Williams

Canterbury v Otago

Dunedin

2012-13

E Lewis

Trinidad & Tobago v Leeward Islands

Trinidad

2013-14

CA Pujara

Derbyshire v Leicestershire

Derby

2014

(Varun Arora is a reporter with CricketCountry.com. He started as a medium-fast bowler, converted to an opening batsman but finally settled with his passion of writing about the game. His Twitter handle is @varunjgd)