REPORT--West-indies-

West Indies last three series results read 2-1, against Pakistan in UAE and at home, and England in their own den. The script remains more or less the same. West Indies fought back after a drubbing, but eventually lost the series.

West Indies were ahead in the Lord s Test, conceding a mere 22-run lead. The pitch had eased off and the skies were clear. However, they could not weather the James Anderson storm, giving his his career best figures of 6 for 42 and thereby conceding the decider by 9 wickets.

In CricketCountry s episode called Marks out of 10, let us rate each of the West Indian on their performances.

Kraigg Brathwaite (7/10, 283 runs at 47): Brathwaite has been West Indies’ crisis man for long. Against India and Pakistan, he displayed remarkable character and stitched out outstanding innings. He continued the same against England, and it was his partnership with Shai Hope in the second Test that gave his team the solitary win.

Kieran Powell (5/10, 142 runs at 23.6): He took his time to get into elements. He almost took his time out of trouble in the last Test, but Anderson was too lethal to play against. He gets extra points for composure.

Kyle Hope (1/10, 41 runs at 6.83): He never got the plot. 25 of his 41 runs came in one innings. Barring that mere cameo, he had no clue of the seam movement in England.

Shai Hope (10/10, 375 runs at 75): He is the highest run-scorer of the series. With 2 hundreds and one fifty, he did everything to ensure a series win for West Indies on English soil since 1988, but that was too much to ask for. Given his performances, it would not be unfair to say that he was on the wrong side of the result. Armed with impeccable technique and unbelievable patience, Hope was the best player of the series.

Roston Chase (3/10, 80 runs at 13.3 and 7 wickets at 40.4): He could not live up to expectations in all departments.

Jermaine Blackwood (5/10, 187 runs at 37.4): He is the only batter, apart from Brathwaite and Shai, to have averaged above 30 in the series. Having said that, he could have stepped up in the Lord s Test when the team needed him the most.

Shane Dowrich (3/10, 24 runs at 4.8 and 9 catches): He had a forgettable tour. He dropped catches behind the wickets, and could not provide impetus with the bat.

Jason Holder (5/10, 86 runs at 17.2 and 8 wickets at 39.1): You pity him for often being on the losing side, but there is very little he can do with whatever sources he has in his ammunition. However, his team has finally been in an upward surge of late.

In the first innings of the last Test, he used 3 pacers to skittle England out in 52 overs, leaving out the leg-spinner Devendra Bishoo. The ploy worked nonetheless.

Kemar Roach (7/10, 11 wickets at 29.81): 5 of his wickets came in the last Test and he etched his name on the Lord s honours board. Had he been more disciplined, the numbers would have been better.

Shannon Gabriel (5/10, 7 wickets at 37.4): He was left out of the opening Test due to injury. When he came back, he rocked England with a four-for in the second Test. He, nonetheless, could not emulate the same in the third Test.

Devendra Bishoo (2/10, 3 wickets at 43): Not his fault but the wickets in England are very conducive to spin. However, he still managed to bowl at an economy of 3.

Alzarri Joseph (0.5, no wickets in one match): He bowled only once, and had to face the wrath of Alastair Cook s double-hundred.

Miguel Cummins (1/10, 1 wicket at 87): His case was the same as Joseph s, but he managed to take a wicket.