Cricketers often have some special relation with certain things which makes them stand out. There have been several cricketers who have taken up writing as their professions, and have done a commendable job of it.  Nikhil Popat digs a bit deeper and brings you five books which five cricketers would have written, given a chance.

The Third Man

Original images from Gettty
Original images from Gettty

Gautam Gambhir was going great guns in his international career. However, there are times when you are doing too well and anything overdone leads to your downfall. Poor Gambhir, playing all three formats of the game, started playing the dab down to third man once too many. That one stroke got him many runs but it has had the better of Gambhir; he has been caught way too many times, trying to play that cute dab. If there was something, Gambhir would write on, it would surely be this.

The Art of an appeal

Original images from Gettty
Original images from Gettty

Kumar Sangakkara has been one great ambassador of cricket, but if there is something that one would want better from him, is the way he carries himself on the field — as a wicketkeeper.  He would go up in an appeal for almost anything and everything, which makes him an ideal candidate to write a book on how to appeal and led the current generation forward.

How not to use DRS

Original images from Gettty
Original images from Gettty

If England are playing a Test featuring Stuart Broad, you are always bound to have some action involving him. It is almost guaranteed that every time Broad’s delivery hits the batsman on the pads he will appeal irrespective where the ball had pitched or where it had hit the batsmen. He seems to have come from the Kumar Sangakkara school of appealing but he does one better. He ensures he gets to review that decision and use DRS simply because it involves him. It might also be a law written in England dressing room, to never refuse to Broad for a DRS review. In this day and age, Broad could do all of us a favour by writing how to not use DRS.

The zero to hero over

Original images from Gettty
Original images from Gettty

Ishant Sharma has had his moments of history, be it his probing spell to Ricky Ponting in Australia in 2008 or his the short ball barrage that won India a Test at Lord’s in 2014. But otherwise, he has been average and that has often resulted in him being the butt of all jokes. But nothing beats the over he bowled in the ICC Champions Trophy 2013 against England.

In a rain-curtailed game, India had put up a low score and England were on course with Eoin Morgan and Ravi Bopara playing very well. England needed 28 runs in 12 balls, when MS Dhoni persisted with Ishant, who had leaked 27 runs in his 3 overs till then. Ishant was hit for a six and bowled a couple of wides. It looked like the game would end in that over itself. It did, for England: Ishant dismissed both set batsmen in consecutive balls. England never recovered and India won the tournament final. In just an over, Indians went from hating Ishant to loving him. Surely, Ishant can pen down his thoughts about it.

Mera Naam Joker

Original images from Gettty
Original images from Gettty

No prizes for guessing, this is Vinod Kambli. What could have been an industrious career in cricket is now a laughing matter for many all thanks to the brilliance of Kambli. He has managed to embarrass himself in situations where none would do that. He seriously can write a book on himself and be happy with all the attention.

Please note this is a humour article — a work of pure fiction

(Nikhil Popat is a cricket lover and a PotterHead. He can be followed on Twitter @CricCrazyNIKS)