Alastair Cook’s cautionary message to Mohammad Amir

Pakistan tour of England in 2010 will be remembered for all the wrong reasons. The spot-fixing scandal threatened the game’s credibility and saw the arrest of three Pakistani cricketers. The youngest of them, Mohammad Amir has made a successful comeback in international cricket after serving a ban of five long years.

Amir has the backing of his skipper Misbah-ul-Haq and many around the world want the 24-year-old to do well. Six years later, Pakistan are back to the country where the infamous tour took place, a tour that has left a stain in the game. England skipper Alastair Cook feels Amir will have to deal with the hostile crowd, voicing their opinions when the tour commences on July 14. ALSO READ: Mohammad Amir will face a lot of pressure during the England tour, says Umar Gul

“I’m sure there will be a reaction and that is right. That is part and parcel, that when you do something like that there are more consequences than just the punishment. That is something for him to cope with, whatever comes his way,” Cook was quoted as saying in The Guardian.

Cook said that the media hullabaloo over Amir would not affect his team, who are focused on concentrating on their game and winning the series. READ MORE: Gracious Virat Kohli and talented Mohammad Amir: Class performers and the mutual respect

Stressing on harsher punishment to match-fixers, Cook further added, “That was the first big one [case of spot-fixing] in England, we had others, but this was the first in the modern era.  Whether I agreed or disagreed with the punishment, he got it, served his time and he is absolutely right to come back. You would have to speak to him. What he did was not good, but he served his punishment then. It hasn’t happened and the ICC hasn’t made any big statements, but if I was in charge if you got caught once that would be it – one strike and you’re out.”

Broad support

However, England bowler Stuart Broad lent some support to Amir, saying he would shake hands with the latter. Broad had scored 169 in the ill-fated Lord’s Test, his only Test hundred and the best he has played. Unfortunately, the knock was overshadowed by the controversies that followed something for which Broad would not ever forgive Amir.