Bell, Trott lift England to consecutive 300s

Jonathan Trott of England is bowled out during the 2011 ICC World Cup Group B match between England and Ireland at the M. Chinnaswamy Stadium on March 2, 2011 in Bangalor

Bell, Trott lift England to consecutive 300s

By Suneer Chowdhary

Bengaluru: Mar 2, 2011

There are two ways that the modern-day Associate sides have of making an upset. Or come near one anyway. Bat first, get to a big enough score and get a few early wickets to put pressure on the opposition and hope that they would crumble. Something similar to the game between Netherlands and England in this World Cup. Or, hope to play on difficult track and hope that the slow and the slow medium bowlers which each of the Associates have aplenty exploit to the fullest. Something similar to the game between Bangladesh and Ireland in this tournament.

Unfortunately for Ireland, neither of the aforementioned seems to have come true for them in their game against England at the M Chinnaswamy in Bangalore. England won the toss and batted on what turned out to be one of the flattest tracks in the World Cup so far. And from there, they proceeded to make 327/8 in their allotted overs, effectively making it near improbable for the Irish to win this.

The day began with the news that Ireland s best bowler from the Bangladesh game, Andre Botha had been pulled out due to an injury. It was a massive blow for the side and it showed on the field. While their fielding remained decent, the bowlers failed to bowl as consistently as one would have liked them to and all the English batsmen who got a chance to bat in the first 40 overs, took full toll. There were others down the order, who would have queuing up to bat as well but the top-order made the feasting a private affair. By the time the lower-order got the chance, there wasn t much left for them.

On the back of an innings that was arguably one of the best by an English cricketer, Andrew Strauss celebrated his birthday by winning the toss and opening the innings. A fruitful partnership with the aggressive Kevin Pietersen followed as the pair added 91 for the first wicket.

Strauss made only 34 (37 balls) out of them and left-arm spinner George Dockrell had the privilege of sending him back. Pietersen, who hasn t scored a century in ODIs since November 2008, got to his half century and then in a manner that would have Mike Gatting squirm with displeasure, reverse-swept the third ball from Paul Stirling into the hands of the wicket-keeper.

That was only the start of the Irish woes.

England s best batsman in either format, Jonathon Trott was joined by the Ian Bell and it hardly looked that they had not been batting together for the whole day yesterday. There were nudges and nurdles to start off with but once the pair had had a look at the pitch, it was the Irish who were doing all the running. They slammed 15 boundaries between them, along with a six to go with it.

Trott was the first to get to his half-century coming off 55 balls but was almost caught up by Bell, who was hogging much of the strike. He got to his second consecutive 50 and with the momentum firmly with England, the Batting Powerplay was taken.

The English did not implode in the manner as they done against India in this portion of play. They were content to pick up the ones and the twos and with the odd boundary got to 45 off the five. They would have almost not lost a wicket either before Bell s 81 was ended by Paul Mooney off its last ball.

That was the start of a minor fightback from Ireland as Trott fell soon after for 92. Only 33 came in the last five and the English ended on 327/8 in their 50, after it once looked like they were good for an easy 350. Mooney s four-wicket haul was his best in ODI cricket.

Brief Scores: England 327/8 in 50 overs (Jonathon Trott 92, Ian Bell 81; John Mooney 4 for 63, Trent Johnston 2 for 58) vs Ireland

(Suneer is a Mumbai-based cricket writer and can be contacted at suneerchowdhary@gmail.com and Tweets here @suneerchowdhary)

Pictures Getty Images

By Suneer Chowdhary


Bengaluru: Mar 2, 2011


There are two ways that the modern-day Associate sides have of making an upset. Or come near one anyway. Bat first, get to a big enough score and get a few early wickets to put pressure on the opposition and hope that they would crumble. Something similar to the game between Netherlands and England in this World Cup. Or, hope to play on difficult track and hope that the slow and the slow medium bowlers which each of the Associates have aplenty exploit to the fullest. Something similar to the game between Bangladesh and Ireland in this tournament.

Unfortunately for Ireland, neither of the aforementioned seems to have come true for them in their game against England at the M Chinnaswamy in Bengaluru. England won the toss and batted on what turned out to be one of the flattest tracks in the World Cup so far. And from there, they proceeded to make 327/8 in their allotted overs, effectively making it near improbable for the Irish to win this.

The day began with the news that Ireland s best bowler from the Bangladesh game, Andre Botha had been pulled out due to an injury. It was a massive blow for the side and it showed on the field. While their fielding remained decent, the bowlers failed to bowl as consistently as one would have liked them to and all the English batsmen who got a chance to bat in the first 40 overs, took full toll. There were others down the order, who would have queuing up to bat as well but the top-order made the feasting a private affair. By the time the lower-order got the chance, there wasn t much left for them.

On the back of an innings that was arguably one of the best by an English cricketer, Andrew Strauss celebrated his birthday by winning the toss and opening the innings. A fruitful partnership with the aggressive Kevin Pietersen followed as the pair added 91 for the first wicket.

Strauss made only 34 (37 balls) out of them and left-arm spinner George Dockrell had the privilege of sending him back. Pietersen, who hasn t scored a century in ODIs since November 2008, got to his half century and then in a manner that would have Mike Gatting squirm with displeasure, reverse-swept the third ball from Paul Stirling into the hands of the wicket-keeper.

That was only the start of the Irish woes.

England s best batsman in either format, Jonathon Trott was joined by the Ian Bell and it hardly looked that they had not been batting together for the whole day yesterday. There were nudges and nurdles to start off with but once the pair had had a look at the pitch, it was the Irish who were doing all the running. They slammed 15 boundaries between them, along with a six to go with it.

Trott was the first to get to his half-century coming off 55 balls but was almost caught up by Bell, who was hogging much of the strike. He got to his second consecutive 50 and with the momentum firmly with England, the Batting Powerplay was taken.

The English did not implode in the manner as they done against India in this portion of play. They were content to pick up the ones and the twos and with the odd boundary got to 45 off the five. They would have almost not lost a wicket either before Bell s 81 was ended by Paul Mooney off its last ball.

That was the start of a minor fightback from Ireland as Trott fell soon after for 92. Only 33 came in the last five and the English ended on 327/8 in their 50 overs, after it once looked like they were good for an easy 350. Mooney s four-wicket haul was his best in ODI cricket.

Brief Scores: England 327/8 in 50 overs (Jonathon Trott 92, Ian Bell 81; John Mooney 4 for 63, Trent Johnston 2 for 58) vs Ireland

(Suneer is a Mumbai-based cricket writer and can be contacted at suneerchowdhary@gmail.com and Tweets here @suneerchowdhary)

Pictures Getty Images