The incident occured on on day three of a CK Nayudu Trophy match between Bengal and Uttar Pradesh in Kalyania, near Kolkata where UP’s left-arm spinner Shiva Singh sent social media into meltdown.
The incident occured on on day three of a CK Nayudu Trophy match between Bengal and Uttar Pradesh in Kalyania, near Kolkata where UP’s left-arm spinner Shiva Singh sent social media into meltdown.

Cricket has seen rapid changes over the years and players too have been evolving over time. Ambidextrous bowlers have become a novelty, but on day three of an under-23 CK Nayudu Trophy match between Bengal and Uttar Pradesh in Kalyania, near Kolkata, UP’s left-arm spinner Shiva Singh sent social media into meltdown.

Singh, who was part of India’s U-19 World Cup-winning team last year, completed a 360-degree turn while bowling his delivery, leaving the on-field umpire Vinod Seshan declare the ball dead.

Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), which lays downs rules for international cricket worldwide, was asked to deliver its verdict on whether the ball can be deemed legal or not.

According to the law published in the Lord’s website on Thursday, it does not dictate what a bowler’s run-up should look like.

It states:

Under Law 21.1, the bowler must state his/her mode of delivery, which seems to have been left arm round the wicket in this case, but does not state how conventional the bowler’s approach should be.

Law 41.4 states:

41.4.1 It is unfair for any fielder deliberately to attempt to distract the striker while he/she is preparing to receive or receiving a delivery.

41.4.2 If either umpire considers that any action by a fielder is such an attempt, he/she shall immediately call and signal Dead ball and inform the other umpire of the reason for the call.  

The law only states if an offence is made to distract the batsman, rather than the batter actually getting distracted. Another point made by the law is for the umpire to decide if he felt the action was done in order to distract the striker.

The law goes on to add that only if 360-degree twirl should be part of the bowler’s run-up for every delivery, then can the umpire step in to deem if the action was done to distract the batsman.

If the batsman is distracted, he can withdraw from his stance and if the umpire does feel that the bowler’s action was done purposefully to distract the batsman, then Law 41.1 will be followed and a penalty of five runs is awarded.