New Zealand trounce Zimbabwe by ten wickets

Martin Guptill and Brendon McCullum during their 163 partnership against Zimbabwe

 

New Zealand trounce Zimbabwe by ten wickets
By Suneer Chowdhary
Ahmedabad: Mar 3, 2011
 
It was a virtual pre-quarter-final according to many. What it turned out to be in reality was a one-sided game between two heavily mismatched sides that saw New Zealand win on a platter.
 
While 163 was never going to test a side with half decent batsmen as the Kiwis, the pronounced gulf between the two sides came through with the thrashing of the Zimbabweans by ten wickets – the same margin as against Kenya. Rubbing the salts was the fact that New Zealand won with almost 17 overs to spare as well.
 
The Kiwis had spoken of how Ray Price was always going to be the key to the Zimbabwean success and that they would look to take him on. Clearly, that was either a smokescreen or they either felt that it wasn’t necessary to keep their words in the end. Price ended with 23 runs coming off his seven overs as the Kiwi openers played him out without taking too many risks, but, at the same time, banished the others to all parts of the ground.
 
Brendon McCullum was surprisingly the slower of the two, with Martin Guptill smashing a couple of sixes and two hits to the boundary  before his partner had even got three. McCullum took his time to get going, probably still reeling from some of strict training regimes under the coach John Wright but once he did hit the middle, there wasn’t any looking back for him either.
 
Guptill got to his half century off 68 and soon had McCullum following it with a 74-ball effort as the two ensured that the win would be theirs with much to spare.
 
That said, it was a surprise that the opening duo did not take the Batting Powerplay in their innings, which could have allowed them to get the game over earlier – and improved the net run-rate. Even a loss of one or two wickets shouldn’t have mattered too much if the side would have aimed to up the ante once they were sure of winning the game anyway.
 
Zimbabwe batted first at the Motera in Ahmedabad, failed to recover from the early loss of Charles Coventry and despite the earnest effort by the lower-order, were bowled out for 162.
 
Zimbabwe won the toss, one of the very few rights to go their way, but one cannot be sure whether the decision to bat first was a correct one. Knowing that their limitation has clearly been their inability to play pace, the Zimbabwean side could have gone in for a slightly more defensive, but probably a more correct decision to field.
 
Instead, once Coventry ran himself out thanks to some lackadaisical running between the wickets and that was an early beginning of the end to their innings. Near-centurion from the previous game Tatenda Taibu got only eight before he had to reluctantly ask for the review of his decision – a wasted effort in the end. Craig Ervine got 11 before he was sucked into an offside trap while Daniel Vettori got Elton Chigumbura and Regis Chakabva in the same over to lose half the side for 46.
 
There was a minor correction thanks to Brendan Taylor’s 44 at the top and Prosper Utseya’s 36 down the order but there wasn’t much other by the way of contribution leading to lowly 162 all out.
Brief scores: Zimbabwe 162 all out in 46.2 overs (Brendan Taylor 44, Prosper Utseya 36; Tim Southee 3 for 29, Daniel Vettori 2 for 25) lost to New Zealand 163 for no loss in 33.3 overs (Martin Guptill 86*, Brendon McCullum 76*)
 
(Suneer is a Mumbai-based cricket writer and can be contacted at suneerchowdhary@gmail.com and Tweets here @suneerchowdhary)
Pictures © Getty Images

By Suneer Chowdhary


Ahmedabad: Mar 4, 2011

 

It was a virtual pre-quarter-final according to many. What it turned out to be in reality was a one-sided game between two heavily mismatched sides that saw New Zealand win on a platter.

While 163 was never going to test a side with half decent batsmen as the Kiwis, the pronounced gulf between the two sides came through with the thrashing of the Zimbabweans by ten wickets – the same margin as against Kenya. Rubbing the salts was the fact that New Zealand won with almost 17 overs to spare as well.

The Kiwis had spoken of how Ray Price was always going to be the key to the Zimbabwean success and that they would look to take him on. Clearly, that was either a smokescreen or they either felt that it wasn’t necessary to keep their words in the end. Price ended with 23 runs coming off his seven overs as the Kiwi openers played him out without taking too many risks, but, at the same time, banished the others to all parts of the ground.

Brendon McCullum was surprisingly the slower of the two, with Martin Guptill smashing a couple of sixes and two hits to the boundary  before his partner had even got three. McCullum took his time to get going, probably still reeling from some of strict training regimes under the coach John Wright but once he did hit the middle, there wasn’t any looking back for him either.

Guptill got to his half century off 68 and soon had McCullum following it with a 74-ball effort as the two ensured that the win would be theirs with much to spare.

That said, it was a surprise that the opening duo did not take the Batting Powerplay in their innings, which could have allowed them to get the game over earlier – and improved the net run-rate. Even a loss of one or two wickets shouldn’t have mattered too much if the side would have aimed to up the ante once they were sure of winning the game anyway.

Zimbabwe batted first at the Motera in Ahmedabad, failed to recover from the early loss of Charles Coventry and despite the earnest effort by the lower-order, were bowled out for 162.

Zimbabwe won the toss, one of the very few rights to go their way, but one cannot be sure whether the decision to bat first was a correct one. Knowing that their limitation has clearly been their inability to play pace, the Zimbabwean side could have gone in for a slightly more defensive, but probably a more correct decision to field.

Instead, once Coventry ran himself out thanks to some lackadaisical running between the wickets and that was an early beginning of the end to their innings. Near-centurion from the previous game Tatenda Taibu got only eight before he had to reluctantly ask for the review of his decision – a wasted effort in the end. Craig Ervine got 11 before he was sucked into an offside trap while Daniel Vettori got Elton Chigumbura and Regis Chakabva in the same over to lose half the side for 46.

There was a minor correction thanks to Brendan Taylor’s 44 at the top and Prosper Utseya’s 36 down the order but there wasn’t much other by the way of contribution leading to lowly 162 all out.

Brief Scores: Zimbabwe 162 all out in 46.2 overs (Brendan Taylor 44, Prosper Utseya 36; Tim Southee 3 for 29, Daniel Vettori 2 for 25) lost to New Zealand 163 for no loss in 33.3 overs (Martin Guptill 86*, Brendon McCullum 76*) 

 

Man of the Match: Martin Guptill (New Zealand).

 

(Suneer is a Mumbai-based cricket writer and can be contacted at suneerchowdhary@gmail.com and Tweets here @suneerchowdhary)

 

Pictures © Getty Images