Virat Kohli © Getty Images
Virat Kohli’s recent verbal assault on a journalist has stirred a massive furore among the media fraternity © Getty Images

The only thing worse than being talked about, is not being talked about. Virat Kohli epitomises the truism. Kohli’s recent verbal assault on a journalist has stirred a massive furore among the media fraternity, which is convinced that Kohli’s behaviour was unbecoming of an Indian Test captain.  

The only thing worse than being talked about, is not being talked about. Virat Kohli epitomises the truism. Kohli’s recent verbal assault on a journalist has stirred a massive furore among the media fraternity, which is convinced that Kohli’s behaviour was unbecoming of an Indian Test captain. Virat Kohli misses press conference after controversy involving Indian cricket journalist

Entrenched in over-professionalism and diplomacy, we tend to forget that in private lives we all dish out a bit of abuse at each other. Our hypocrisy as a human race is emphatically highlighted in that fact. Also for the incident to escalate to a point where the journalist in question thought it necessary to take up the matter officially with the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and the International Cricket Council (ICC) is ludicrous. The expletives spat out didn’t resonate but a non-reaction in such a situation would have made Kohli look like a fool, especially considering the fact that the abuse was hurled at the wrong person. For god’s sake write about it, that’d be more interesting. The average viewer would be titillated. But when egos get trampled upon and bruised, as is often the case in Indian cricket, it becomes a part of a problem (which includes those playing and covering the sport). Virat Kohli did not use abusive language: Indian team management

Besides what could Kohli have said that you don’t hear every day in the streets of Delhi? They say, you can take the delhi-ite out of Delhi but not the Delhi out of the delhi-ite. Of course puritans would argue that we must protect the fledgling, impressionable minds following the game from being exposed to profanity, but what exactly are we trying to hide? It seems utterly unfair to expect sportsmen to be anything but what they are. To look at them for inspiration or as role models in anything but their area of expertise is downright stupid. Wonder how we would have reacted to Shane Warne’s philandering ways, had he been an Indian?  (Not that this is an Indian problem per se). It angered to switch on TV and find surrogate debates galore on whether Tiger Woods should apologise for apparent misdemeanours in his personal life? All this sanctimonious talk is quite hideous, to be honest.  Virat Kohli hurls abuse at journalist after training in Perth

Kohli’s behaviour may be condemned: Let’s suppose it is a matter of perception. Because it is hard to sit here and know what prompted a reaction such as that. And if we heard Kohli’s version, the self-righteous society that we are will be quick to pronounce a judgement.

However, the more pressing matter to emerge from this ugly situation is the souring of ties between players and the media. This pertains mostly to Indian cricketers. The BCCI is largely responsible for this, because it’s own strained relationship with the media, sometimes has a cascading effect. The fact that the Indian players are kept away from the intrusive media, means that occasionally stories are dug up. This tabloid style of reporting is deeply pervasive.

Gone are the days that journalists had free access to players but had an unwritten code about not reporting anything untoward about a player’s personal life. The root of the problem is the non-existence of a healthy interaction between players and Journalists. Mundane press conferences aside, the players are generally reticent, which naturally bothers the media. So, if Anurag Thakur is serious about avoiding such incidents recurring, the players must have a channel of communication open, and that surely is not possible when everyone is gagged up. ICC Cricket World Cup 2015: Pool-wise Team Standings