Finch’s form “hell of a headache” for Australia selectors: Ian Chappell
Aaron Finch's form is a major concern. (AFP Image)

Ian Chappell has weighed in on Aaron Finch‘s wretched run and feels the captain’s terrible form is ought to to give selectors a “hell of a headache” ahead of Australia‘s World Cup defence. Finch has been worked out by India‘s bowlers ever since the start of the four-Test series in December and as per Chappell, Finch playing Test cricket is possibly the “worst thing to have happened to him.”

Finch made his Test debut against Pakistan in the UAE in October, where he began his Test career with a half-century before enduring a slump. In the Border-Gavaskar Trophy, Finch scored 97 runs from three matches before being dropped for the Sri Lanka Tests. His ODI run isn’t faring any better, with the skipper tallying 26 runs in three games against India in January. Besides, Finch had another forgettable outing in the first ODI against India – his 100th one-day international – in which he was dismissed for a third-ball duck.

With nine ODI to go before the World Cup, Chappell feels the selectors will have a tough time dealing with Finch’s case, who is also supposed to lead Australia in the World Cup.

“It’s a hell of a headache for the selectors,” Chappell told Wide World of Sports. “But you have to think about what is worse, dropping him now or dropping him in the middle of the World Cup?”

“Probably the worst thing that happened to Aaron Finch was playing Test cricket,” Chappell said. “Certainly, India worked him out in the Test matches, and that flowed on into the one-day series. He’s playing like a man without much confidence. You get the feeling confidence was such a huge part of his one-day batting, and I’m not sure if one score against Pakistan in the UAE is going to restore that, especially if he continues to struggle through the rest of the Indian series.”

That said, Chappell hasn’t ruled out the possibility of a change in guard heading into Australia’s World Cup defence, however unlikely a move that may be. Chappell adds that if it’s a risk the selectors are willing to take, red-hot Pat Cummins seems a strong candidate to shepherd Australia at the World Cup.

“He’s probably the outstanding candidate. They might be forced to go with Cummins, but it’s not an ideal situation and it’s a hell of a headache for the selectors. And it’s a headache that’s been looming ever since Finch started to struggle,” Chappell added.