It was the third time Aaron Finch coped up with a blow on the same finger which was hit previously by Mitchell Starc at the WACA ground. @ Cricket Australia
It was the third time Aaron Finch coped up with a blow on the same finger which was hit previously by Mitchell Starc at the WACA ground. @ Cricket Australia

Aaron Finch looked in no sort of pain as Australia departed from Perth to gear up for the all-important Boxing Day Test against India, a must-win for both teams in the four-match Border-Gavaskar Trophy.

Finch, who was struck by a vicious bouncer from Mohammed Shami in the second Test at Perth which the hosts won by 146 runs, lasted just one ball before he was retired hurt and sent to hospital for X-rays.

ALSO READ: Aaron Finch driven to hospital after coping nasty blow from Mohammed Shami

Scans revealed no major fracture as Finch, who failed to take the field during India s second innings, will be fit to play for the hosts in the third Test.

It was the third time Finch copped up with a blow on the same finger which was hit previously by Mitchell Starc at the WACA ground.

“It’s a finger that I’ve broken before in Sri Lanka a few years ago,” Finch was quoted as saying by cricket.com.au on Thursday.

ALSO READ: Aaron Finch cleared of serious injury: Cricket Australia

“To have it hit three times pretty solid in a month, it just keeps blowing up. But it’ll be no problem for the game.”

Meanwhile, the pitch at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) will be a far cry from the one at Perth, which offered plenty of pace and bounce. However, this time around curator of the MCG is believed to inject more life in the drop-in wicket by putting a layer of sand between the concrete base and the pitch trays and will leave more grass on the pitch.

“I assume there’ll be a little bit more grass on it,” Finch said.

“I haven’t played a Shield game there but the boys said there has been a little bit more grass on it and it’s seamed around a little, bit but it’s still been on the slower side.

With the pitch, which was rated poor by the ICC during the tame Ashes Test draw, expected to be batting-friendly, Finch does not see much of a difference. “I don’t expect that to change a hell of a lot. They’re still the same drop-ins from the last 10 or 12 years … I’m sure they’re trying a different method though,” he said.