Replays showed a slight nick on the hotspot, but with the Snickometer showing no spike, Haig chose to go ahead with the on-field decision leaving Mitchell and his captain Kane Williamson, at the non-striker’s end and the commentators baffled. @ AFP

The second Twenty20 International between India and New Zealand was marred with slight controversy during the Kiwi innings. Daryl Mitchell was ruled out lbw off Krunal Pandya, but he opted for a DRS. Replays showed a slight nick on the hotspot, but with the Snickometer showing no spike, Shaun Haig chose to go ahead with the on-field decision leaving Mitchell and his captain Kane Williamson, at the non-striker’s end and the commentators baffled.

Sheldon Eden-Whaitiri, New Zealand Cricket‘s (NZC) match officials’ manager, feels Haig should have overturned the decision, but admitted that the third umpire was gutted with by his decision. “Shaun was really feeling it in the 24 hours post the match,” Eden-Whaitiri said in an interview with stuff.co.nz. (ALSO READ: Cheteshwar Pujara reveals the best sledge from an Australian player)

“He felt he let his umpire team down that night by not interpreting the information to get the right outcome. That’s in hindsight. He had to get back on the horse less than 48 hours later because he was on-field in Hamilton. Shaun took it the right way – how am I going to get better?”

Eden-Whaitiri backed the quality of umpires in New Zealand over the last few seasons. “We made a lot of changes three seasons ago and in those three years, this is probably the only story that’s been on the back page,” he said.

“So, the umpiring standards internationally have been pretty strong the last three years – just one error by a TV umpire isn’t going to diminish all the good work we’ve done with Chris Brown, Shaun Haig (both former players) and Wayne Knights. (ALSO READ: India should include Rishabh Pant in the playing XI for the World Cup: Mohammad Azharuddin)

“Wayne hasn’t made an error since December 2017. People can’t understand – all this technology, how are you going to make an error? But sometimes it happens, and we’ve just got to learn from it.”

He also admitted that he had no qualms to admit that Haig did make a mistake. “I’ve got no issue coming out and saying when we make an error; it’s part and parcel of sport, officials make errors. However, there are times when observations by commentators, journalists, etc aren’t quite correct,” he said.

India levelled the series with a seven-wicket win after going down by a record 80 runs in the opener. However, in the third and final T20I, New Zealand managed to win by a narrow four runs to win the series 2-1.