Kane Williamson (left) and Ross Taylor have the second-best ©
Kane Williamson (left) and Ross Taylor have the second-best partnership average for all pairs with at least 2,000 ODI runs ©

Kane Williamson and Ross Taylor put on their fourth consecutive century partnership when they put on 137 for the third wicket in the first One-Day International (ODI) between New Zealand and Zimbabwe at Harare. Here is a look at one of the most productive stands in ODIs.Kane Williamson and Ross Taylor are fast emerging as among the most productive partnerships in ODIs. As things stand, they are a long way off from achieving the runs that Sachin Tendulkar and Sourav Ganguly boast of, but in terms of average, they are right up there up near the top. Given that their last four partnerships have yielded over 100 runs, they will probably not find it too difficult to enhance that average. Ross Taylor ton sees New Zealand post commanding 303/4 against Zimbabwe in first ODI at Harare

Statistically, Taylor and Williamson average 60.91 together over 38 innings. Only Hashim Amla and AB de Villiers (who are Bradmanesque with an average of 81.96) are higher up in terms of average. Below is a table showing the leading ODI partnerships with at least 2,000 runs in descending order of average: BLOG: Zimbabwe vs New Zealand 2015, 1st ODI at Harare

Batsmen

Period

I

NO

Runs

Highest

Ave

100s

50s

Hashim Amla, AB de Villiers

2008-2015

35

2

2,705

238

81.96

10

8

Ross Taylor, Kane Williamson

2010-2015

38

2

2,193

206

60.91

10

7

Gautam Gambhir, Virat Kohli

2008-2013

35

2

2,000

224

60.6

7

4

MS Dhoni, Suresh Raina

2005-2015

69

10

3,563

196*

60.38

9

18

Virat Kohli, Suresh Raina

2008-2015

40

5

2,018

146*

57.65

6

9

Ajay Jadeja, Sachin Tendulkar

1992-2000

41

4

2,111

176

57.05

9

8

AB de Villiers, Graeme Smith

2005-2013

42

1

2,278

186

55.56

7

10

AB de Villiers, JP Duminy

2007-2015

49

11

2,083

219

54.81

5

13

Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Ramnaresh Sarwan

2001-2011

49

3

2,498

149

54.3

6

18

Michael Clarke, Andrew Symonds

2003-2009

49

8

2,205

220

53.78

4

14

The table is dominated by Indians, with four of the top six partnerships being Indian. However, Taylor and Williamson are currently in the top two, and barring a major loss of form by either one, are unlikely to concede their position. It is not only average that Taylor and Williamson have managed to excel at. They have put on 10 century stands so far in ODIs, which at this point is almost certain to go up. Below is a table showing the most century stands in ODIs: Zimbabwe vs New Zealand 2015, Live Cricket Score: 1st ODI at Harare

Batsmen

Period

I

NO

Runs

Highest

Ave

100s

50s

Sourav Ganguly, Sachin Tendulkar

1992-2007

176

3

8227

258

47.55

26

29

Tillakaratne Dilshan, Kumar Sangakkara

2000-2015

108

6

5475

210*

53.67

20

19

Adam Gilchrist, Matthew Hayden

2000-2008

117

3

5409

172

47.44

16

29

Gordon Greenidge, Desmond Haynes

1979-1991

103

4

5206

192*

52.58

15

25

Mahela Jayawardene, Kumar Sangakkara

2000-2015

151

7

5992

179

41.61

15

32

Marvan Atapattu, Sanath Jayasuriya

1996-2007

144

5

5462

237

39.29

14

26

Virender Sehwag, Sachin Tendulkar

2001-2012

114

2

4387

182

39.16

13

18

Andy Flower, Grant Flower

1992-2003

88

4

3942

161

46.92

12

17

Michael Clarke, Ricky Ponting

2003-2011

57

4

2719

161

51.3

11

9

Herschelle Gibbs, Graeme Smith

2002-2009

84

1

3607

187

43.45

11

15

Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly

1996-2007

88

1

4363

318

50.14

11

18

Rahul Dravid, Sachin Tendulkar

1996-2009

98

5

4117

331

44.26

11

14

Hashim Amla, AB de Villiers

2008-2015

35

2

2705

238

81.96

10

8

Ross Taylor, Kane Williamson

2010-2015

38

2

2193

206

60.91

10

7

Matthew Hayden, Ricky Ponting

2001-2008

73

6

3514

219

52.44

10

15

The most 100-plus partnerships have been put on by Tendulkar and Ganguly, but there is a huge cluster in the 10-15 centuries mark. Another few big knocks together could see Taylor and Williamson — both in great form — reach close to the top. READ: New Zealand play as Aotearoa in honour of Maori heritage