If T20Is are any indicator, Virat Kohli’s Indian team is right at ‘home’ in Australia
Chants of “India, India, India!” ring loud and each time an India player hits a boundary. @Getty

The three-match Twenty20 international series between India and Australia last week had three different results – the hosts won the first, the second was washed out and Virat Kohli led his team to victory on Sunday – but there was one common theme to each match.

And that was the sight of blue dominating the packed stands at the Gabba, the MCG and the SCG.

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Cricket Australia was expecting a sold-out T20I series between Kohli’s India and Aaron Finch’s Australia, with as many as 130,000 fans believed to be in attendance in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney, and that’s what happened. Of these, the most numbers were for Friday’s second T20I at the MCG where 70,000 spectators packed in for what turned out to be a damp squib, followed by 37,399 fans for the decider in Sydney and 30,000 for the opening match at the Gabba.

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. Indian ex-patriates and Australian-born India supporters dominated the stands at the Gabba, MCG and SCG with hardly any signs of Australian gold.

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Chants of “India, India, India!” rang loud and each time an India player hit a boundary – more so when it was one of Shikhar Dhawan, Rohit Sharma and Kohli – a tumultuous din arose across the grounds. Finch and his team-mates could be forgiven for wondering where they actually were.

While such passionate support will likely dim when the four-match Test series gets underway on December 6 at Adelaide Oval given the popularity of T20I cricket, there is plenty of indication that Kohli’s team will have much vocal support in the stands.

Sights like this are not going to be seen in Australia. © Getty Images
Sights like this are not going to be seen in Australia. © Getty Images

On a different note, Kohli’s prolific record in the country is only matched by his one-field duels with Australian cricketers over the years, and on Tuesday he stated that his team will stand up for itself  if the line is crossed by the home team, while defining aggression ahead of the T20I series.

This is Kohli’s third Test tour to Australia, having been their top run-getter in 2011-12 when in his first year of Test cricket (he made 300 runs in four Tests) and then putting up a record 692 runs at 86.50, with four centuries, in 2014-15.

Who can forget the image of way a young Kohli flipping his middle finger to a hostile Sydney crowd during the 2011-12 tour to Australia?